AppDynamics recognized by Forrester in APM market overview

Interest in the Application Performance Management (APM) category is very high right now.   To stay one step ahead of their clients, the Industry Analysts who cover the category and write research to advise their clients have been very busy.  In December alone, there were six different analyst reports being researched by the major analyst firms.

Forrester published the results of their research in the 2nd week of December with the report: Market Overview: Application Performance Management, Q4 2011.  Forrester clients can access the report at www.forrester.com. In this report, Forrester provides very sound advice on why APM exists and what it should do for clients. Forrester has created their own “Reference Model” for APM and evaluated the vendor landscape against those criteria.

Raison d’etre for APM

Forrester VP and Principal Analyst, JP Garbani, gives readers very pragmatic advice on the raison d’etre for APM.  Simply put, APM’s job is to:

1) Alert IT to application performance and availability issues before a full-scale outage occurs

2) Isolate or pinpoint the problem source

3) Provide deep-diagnostics to enable IT to determine the root cause

For several years now, JP Garbani has been on the forefront of proclaiming that modern APM solutions should enable IT organizations to manage apps not by gauging the heath of their servers or servlets, but instead by assessing what the customer or end-user cares about most – whether their Business Transaction completes quickly and doesn’t make them wait.  He states that this has become even more critical as applications have gotten more distributed and complex.

Just how complex can a Login Transaction be? Answer: Very!

People in our industry always talk about IT complexity and cost. Cost is pretty easy to calculate, because IT budgets are allocated and audited every year. Complexity is very different–we know it exists, but we can’t really see or measure it. Complexity is often when our brain tries to understand something and stalls in the process, trying to make sense of information that has never been seen before.

Well, this happened to a few of us in AppDynamics last week. A customer was kind enough to share how a single login business transaction flowed across their entire infrastructure. You might be thinking: “How can a login transaction be complex? That’s just a simple call to an LDAP or SiteMinder tier”–which is pretty much what we all thought it was. However, the screenshot that graced us was one of shock, beauty and amazement. In fact, I’m looking at it right now before I scrub the customer details, and I’m still thinking “Hmmmm, this is bonkers.”

Without delaying further, here is that very screenshot showing the Login Business Transaction:

Scary huh? What you see is the flow and timing of a Customer Login business transaction as it executes across a well governed, regulated, SOA environment consisting of many services (denoted by the Java Tiers). The Customer Login transaction begins at the Java node to the right marked “START” and propagates across the entire SOA environment using a combination of sync/async JMS messages, HTTP and RMI communication to notify other Services that a customer is now active and logged in. You can also see many services writing to a database as a result of this transaction. These invocations are simply auditing the customer login to satisfy the legal regulations that this organization has to comply with. So if you ever wonder what impact Governance and Legislation has on IT, this is a perfect example of the complexity storm it creates. What’s interesting is that the Logout business transaction for this application was just as complex!

The screenshot above unfortunately reflects the enormous complexity that many IT departments have to deal with everyday, especially when a user complains that their business transaction is slow. The problem for 95% of IT departments is they don’t have this type of visibility in production. They can feel pain, but they can’t see it. A slow business transaction may take 25 seconds to complete and touch many infrastructure tiers along the way. Unless IT sees this end to end journey they’ll always struggle to troubleshoot and manage it.

The good news is you’re 30 minutes away from getting this visibility in production by evaluating a next generation application monitoring solution like AppDynamics Pro. AppDynamics will auto-discover your business transactions, map their specific flows across your infrastructure, and give you a latency breakdown across and inside every tier the business transaction touches.

To manage and master IT complexity you have to visualize and see it.  Seeing how your business actually runs across IT is completely different to guessing how your business runs across IT. Next time a user complains that their business transaction is slow, what will you do? Bury your head in a log file, or visualize how that business transaction executed using an application performance monitoring solution like AppDynamics?

Isn’t it about time you mapped your app?

App Man.

Not Everyone is an Application Expert

The majority of us in IT are specialists, with the exception of a few VPs of engineering who are “special” in their own “special” world of being “special.” What I mean by this is that no single person has the skills or experience to do everything well in IT. IT is too big for me to explain or summarize in a few words, other than it requires a lot of different people with different skills to make it tick along. Despite applications being the living breathing entities of the business, a large portion of folk in IT have little context of how applications are built, how they execute, and how they consume resource across the IT infrastructure. Many people simply don’t care as their responsibilities are completely void of anything application related. That’s fine–but the reality is that everyone in IT should have one eye on the business. The whole reason IT exists is so the business can be more competitive and make more money. If this happens, IT gets more budget and is allowed to innovate more. IT and the business need each other to survive, which is why when applications slow down or break, both parties bitch at each other.

Operations need better visibility

Unfortunately for both the business and IT, the people (Operations) who manage the performance and availability of applications in production aren’t application experts. They are also not stupid either; their skills sets are wide and broad across many technologies and platforms that underpin applications. They manage a lot of things that application developers take for granted, like networks, databases, storage and virtualization. While Operations monitor the health of these infrastructure components, they often get bombarded with crap from the business when end users and business transactions are being impacted by slow performance, despite all system monitoring showing everything is fine. This lack of understanding between the Business and Operations is because both parties see things from different perspectives.