How much does downtime cost?

Unscheduled downtime happens all the time. In 2012 alone dozens of big-name websites went down for hours at a time, from GoDaddy.com to, well, almost anything running on Amazon. Every time an outage occurs, the Internet has a field day speculating about everything from the cause of the outage to who got fired for it. Some more transparent companies will publish a post-mortem on their blog with the details, which is nice, but there’s one question that’s almost never answered: how much did the downtime cost?

Various analysts & institutions have taken a stab at trying to answer this question with exhaustive research and surveys. The results are not very conclusive – it seems that the answer depends on the industry, the size of the company, the type of application, and even the year. We took a shot at breaking it all down for you in the infographic below: How much does downtime really cost  you?

Summary: How much does downtime cost?

Downtime is really expensive – especially if you work at a financial services institution that relies on transaction-based fees like credit card transaction fees or trading fees. But there are costs associated with downtime that we don’t imagine – for example, the human cost of having to spend every day firefighting instead of focusing on other projects, or the damage to your company’s brand, which can impact customer loyalty. It may be worth the effort to find out what downtime costs your organization, and how much of it you can afford.

Financial Services White Paper

Applications were failing long before Cloud came along

I’m fed up of reading about Cloud outages, largely because all applications are created and managed by the most dangerous species on the planet – the human being. Failure is inevitable in regards to everything the human being creates or touches, and for this reason alone I see no news in seeing the word “outage” in IT articles with or without Cloud mentioned.

What gets me the most is that applications, infra-structure and data centers were slowing down and blowing up long before “Clouds” became fashionable. They just didn’t make the news every other week when applications resided in “data-centers”–ah, the good old days. Just ask anyone who works in operations or help desk/app support whether they’ve worked a 38 hour week; I guess the vast majority will either laugh or slap you. If everything worked according to plan, IT would be a really dull place to work, help desk would be replaced with OK desk, and we’d have nothing to talk about in the office or pub.