Engineering, Product

Understanding the Momentum Behind .NET Core

By | | 3 min read


Summary
A free, cross-platform, open-source version of Microsoft’s .NET development platform .NET Core is being rapidly adopted by IT organizations and DevOps teams looking to modernize monolithic on-premises applications and move to cloud platforms where they can leverage microservices.

Three years ago Satya Nadella took over as CEO of Microsoft, determined to spearhead a renewal of the iconic software maker. He laid out his vision in a famous July 10, 2014 memo to employees in which he declared that “nothing was off the table” and proclaimed his intention to “obsess over reinventing productivity and platforms.”

How serious was Nadella? In the summer of 2016, Microsoft took the bold step of releasing .NET Core, a free, cross-platform, open-source version of its globally popular .NET development platform. With .NET Core, .NET apps could run natively on Linux and macOS as well as Windows.

For customers .NET Core solved a huge problem of portability. .NET shops could now easily modernize monolithic on-premises enterprise applications by breaking them up into microservices and moving them to cloud platforms like Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, or Google Cloud Platform. They had been hearing about the benefits of containerization: speed, scale and, most importantly, the ability to create an application and run it anywhere. Their developers loved Docker’s ease of use and installation, as well as the automation it brought to repetitive tasks. But just moving a large .NET application to the cloud had presented daunting obstacles. The task of lifting and shifting the large system-wide installations that supported existing applications consumed massive amounts of engineering manpower and often did not deliver the expected benefits, such as cost savings. Meanwhile, the dependency on the Windows operating system limited cloud options, and microservices remained a distant dream.

.NET Core not only addressed these challenges, it was also ideal for containers. In addition to starting a container with an image based on the Windows Server, engineers could also use much smaller Windows Nano Server images or Linux images. This meant engineers had the freedom of working across platforms. They were no longer required to deploy server apps solely on Windows Server images.

Typically, the adoption of a new developer platform would take time, but .NET Core experienced a large wave of early adoption. Then, in August 2017, .NET Core 2.0 was released, and adoption increased exponentially. The number of .NET Core users reached half a million by January 2018. By achieving almost full feature parity with .NET Framework 4.6.1, .NET Core 2.0 took away all the pain that had previously existed in shifting from the traditional .NET Framework to .NET Core. Libraries that hadn’t existed in .NET Core 1.0 were added to .NET Core 2.0. Because .NET Core implemented all 32,000 APIs in .NET Standard 2.0 most applications could reuse their existing code.

Engineering teams who have struggled with DevOps initiatives found that .NET Core allowed them to accelerate their move to microservices architectures and to put in place a more streamlined path from development to testing and deployment. Lately, hiring managers have started telling their recruiters to be sure and mention the opportunity to work with .NET Core as an enticement to prospective hires—something that never would have happened with .NET.

At AppDynamics, we’re so excited about the potential of .NET Core that we’ve tripled the size of the engineering team working on .NET. And, just last month, we announced a beta release of support for .NET Core 2.0 on Windows using the new the .NET micro agent released in our Winter ‘17 product release. This agent provides improved microservices support as more customers choose .NET Core to implement multicloud strategies. Reach out to your account team to participate in this beta.

Stay tuned for my next blog posts on how to achieve end-to-end visibility across all your .NET apps, whether they run on-premises, in the cloud, or in multi-cloud and hybrid environments.