Product

The Three Faces of the Hybrid Cloud

By | | 2 min read


Summary
Most people, thankfully, have acknowledged that the cloud is real.  For groups such as development and testing, it's not only real, but highly successful; we're seeing our customers and prospects use the public clouds, or build and deploy private clouds at a much more rapid pace than even a year ag...

Most people, thankfully, have acknowledged that the cloud is real.  For groups such as development and testing, it’s not only real, but highly successful; we’re seeing our customers and prospects use the public clouds, or build and deploy private clouds at a much more rapid pace than even a year ago. The real question is this: when will companies starting deploying their complex production environments in the cloud?

Some pundits believe that enterprises will ditch their data centers and move their complex production applications completely into the cloud.  But this is not pragmatic.  We have talked to hundreds of enterprises and the people responsible for their complex production applications.  From these conversations, we have gained a sense of the overarching strategy that many companies are adopting.What we are seeing is a recurring scenario where enterprises move production environments to the cloud–but this migration involves a physical-cloud “hybrid” approach instead of a “pure cloud” approach.

Here are the hybrid approaches that I believe we will begin to see in abundance:

1.  Hybrid Physical-Cloud SOA: The business decides that it needs quick time-to-market for some new functionality, but IT folks can’t procure new machines quickly enough to meet the deadline. The business groups then decide to use the cloud for capacity for the new functionality. These new services in the cloud communicate to and from the existing services and functionality in the data center.

2. Cloud Bursting: Companies using cloud for temporary capacity in case of a spike.  For example, let’s say an eCommerce greeting card company needs 100 machines on Mother’s Day, but doesn’t want to buy them–so they get that capacity temporarily in the cloud.

3.  Cloud Failover: Using the cloud for failover and disaster recovery

We are definitely seeing companies begin to move services to the cloud, but they don’t want to risk critical production apps responsible for $2 billion in revenue. For now, hybrid is the way to go.

But only for now…