Engineering, Product

Advances In Mesh Technology Make It Easier for the Enterprise to Embrace Containers and Microservices

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Summary
Mid-to-late summer 2018 has seen a lot of advances in service mesh technologies, with several notable projects being released or promoted. Here’s what you need to know before embarking on your own service mesh journey.

More enterprises are embracing containers and microservices, which bring along additional networking complexities. So it’s no surprise that service meshes are in the spotlight now. There have been substantial advances recently in service mesh technologies—including Istio’s 1.0, Hashi Corp’s Consul 1.2.1, and Buoyant merging Conduent into LinkerD—and for good reason.

Some background: service meshes are pieces of infrastructure that facilitate service-to-service communication—the backbone of all modern applications. A service mesh allows for codifying more complex networking rules and behaviors such as a circuit breaker pattern. AppDev teams can start to rely on service mesh facilities, and rest assured their applications will perform in a consistent, code-defined manner.

Endpoint Bloom

The more services and replicas you have, the more endpoints you have. And with the container and microservices boom, the number of endpoints is exploding. With the rise of Platform-as-a-Services and container orchestrators, new terms like ingress and egress are becoming part of the AppDev team vernacular. As you go through your containerization journey, multiple questions will arise around the topic of connectivity. Application owners will have to define how and where their services are exposed.

The days of providing the networking team with a context/VIP to add to web infrastructure—such as services.acme.com/shoppingCart over port 443—are fading. Today, AppDev teams are more likely to hand over a Kubernetes YAML to add services.acme.com/shoppingCart to the Ingress controller, and then describe a behavior. Example: the shopping cart Pod needs to talk to the shopping cart validation Pod, which can only be accessed by the shopping cart because the inventory is kept on another set of Reddis Pods, which can’t be exposed to the outside world.

You’re juggling all of this while navigating constraints set by defined and deployed Kubernetes networking. At this point, don’t be alarmed if you’re thinking, “Wow, I thought I was in AppDev—didn’t know I needed a CCNA to get my application deployed!”

The Rise of the Service Mesh

When navigating the “fog of system development,” it’s tricky to know all the moving pieces and connectivity options. With AppDev teams focusing mostly on feature development rather than connectivity, it’s very important to make sure all the services are discoverable to them. Investments in API management are the norm now, with teams registering and representing their services in an API gateway or documenting them in Swagger, for example.

But what about the underlying networking stack? Services might be discoverable, but are they available? Imagine a Venn diagram of AppDev vs. Sys Engineer vs. SRE: Who’s responsible for which task? And with multiple pieces of infrastructure to traverse, what would be a consistent way to describe networking patterns between services?

Service Mesh to the Rescue

Going back to the endpoint bloom, consistency and predictability are king. Over the past few years, service meshes have been maturing and gaining popularity. Here are some great places to learn more about them:

Service Mesh 101

In the Istio model, applications participate in a service mesh. Istio acts as the mesh, and then applications can participate in the mesh via a sidecar proxy—Envoy, in Istio’s case.

Your First Mesh

DZone has a very well-written article about standing up your first Java application in Kubernetes to participate in an Istio-powered service mesh. The article goes into detail about deploying Istio itself in Kubernetes (in this case, MinuKube). For an AppDev team, the new piece would be creating the all-important routing rules, which are deployed to Istio.

Which One of these Meshes?

The New Stack has a very good article comparing the pros and cons of the major service mesh providers. The post lays out the problem in granular format, and discusses which factors you should consider to determine if your organization is even ready for a service mesh.

Increasing Importance of AppDynamics

With the advent of the service mesh, barriers are falling and enabling services to communicate more consistently, especially in production environments.

If tweaks are needed on the routing rules—for example, a time out—it’s best to have the ability to pinpoint which remote calls would make the most sense for this task. AppDynamics has the ability to examine service endpoints, which can provide much-needed data for these tweaks.

For the service mesh itself, AppDynamcs in Kubernetes can even monitor the health of your applications deployed on a Kubernetes cluster.

With the rising velocity of new applications being created or broken into smaller pieces, AppDynamics can help make sure all of these components are humming at their optimal frequency.